Super Heroes in real life saving people caught in camera

Rating

  • Related Video Tags : , , , , ,

    Super heroes in real life saving people caught in camera the author described in YouTube channel are, There are many kinds of heroes. Sometimes, it’s a person providing a moment of happiness in an otherwise bleak day. Other times, it’s a person donning a colorful latex suit and mask and patrolling the streets, poised to protect their city. Either way, it’s important to celebrate acts of heroism in our otherwise ordinary world, so here are five real life superheroes caught saving people.

    Super Heroes

    Tommy Norman

    963 people were killed by police in the United States in 2016. And while no single superhero in blue could make up for that tragic statistic, Officer Tommy Norman of North Little Rock, Arkansas is certainly going to try. Instead of reactively keeping the peace in his community, Officer Norman has been caught on camera hundreds of times going further than the extra mile. Sometimes, it’s as simple as helping organize donation drives for food and clothing. Other times, he wrenches the hearts of his Instagram followers by filling his police car full of toys and passing them out to children around town. His antics and heart of gold have gotten him attention from Golden Globe winner Taraji P. Henson as well as rapper The Game, the latter of whom started a Go Fund Me page on Officer Norman’s behalf to help fund his efforts to bring his community together and spread the message that good cops absolutely can and do exist.

    Daytona Beach Lifeguards

    Unfortunately, many heroes go nameless, like the quick-to-action lifeguards in this viral rescue video from 2014. A suicidal pregnant mother in Daytona Beach had driven her minivan into the ocean, her three children strapped inside. Thankfully, not only were their lifeguards nearby to jump to the rescue, but a Canadian tourist managed to get the entire event on camera. First, one lifeguard managed to grab the elder two children in his arms, carrying them through the choppy surf to safety.

    Greig Tonkins

    As the saying goes, not all heroes wear capes, and to take it a step further, not all those who need saved are human. In 2016, Greig Tonkins, a zookeeper from the Taronga Western Plains Zoo, was pig hunting with a few friends and his trusty hunting dog. The purpose of the trip was to help a terminally ill pal hunt a boar, but the Australian wilderness had other ideas. The human hunters were in a vehicle with Tonkins noticed something strange up ahead- a male kangaroo, inexplicably, had his dog in a headlock. Undeterred, impressive considering that a kick from a kangaroo’s powerful legs could disembowel a person, Tonkins punched the aggressor straight in the nose, saving his dog and securing his place on this real life superhero list.

    Phoenix Jones

    If you’re jonesing for a more traditional superhero, though, look no further than Phoenix Jones, a Seattle, Washington-based hero whose “secret identity,” Benjamin Fodor, is a mixed martial artist signed to the World Series of Fighting. Between 2011 and 2014, Jones led the organization the “Rain City Superhero Movement,” which consisted of various costumed heroes from the Seattle area with military or mixed martial arts backgrounds. Since 2014, however, Jones has patrolled the city as a lone Phoenix, breaking up fights and, in one case, getting his own nose broken when he was held up at gunpoint for attempting to intervene in a particularly nasty conflict.

    Zac Mihajlovic

    If a sheikh in Dubai offered six figures for a custom Batmobile, based on the design from the 1989 Tim Burton film, most people wouldn’t blink before sealing the deal. But Zac Mihajlovic from Camden, Australia did more than blink- he decided to give back to his community. The impressively detailed comic book car was made using actual parts of the Batmobile from the movie, and Mihajlovic collaborated with his grandfather, a retired engineer, to make it street-legal. Once the ride was complete and the lucrative offers for it were turned down, this Australian Batman teamed up with the Make-A-Wish Foundation to take terminally ill children on a crime-fighting ride with the caped crusader.